Abandon all hope, ye who enter dates in Excel

Unfortunate, but unfortunately true…

Data Pub

Big thanks to Kara Woo of Washington State University for this guest blog post!

Update: The XLConnect package has been updated to fix the problem described below; however, other R packages for interfacing with Excel may import dates incorrectly. One should still use caution when storing data in Excel.


Like anyone who works with a lot of data, I have a strained relationship with Microsoft Excel. Its ubiquity forces me to tolerate it, yet I believe that it is fundamentally a malicious force whose main goal is to incite chaos through the obfuscation and distortion of data.1 After discovering a truly ghastly feature of how it handles dates, I am now fully convinced.

As it turns out, Excel “supports” two different date systems: one beginning in 1900 and one beginning in 1904.2 Excel stores all dates as floating point numbers representing the number of days since a given…

View original post 660 more words

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Computers & Internet

Your comments:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s